RE-OPENING, during COVID19, OUR CHURCHES – AND OUR PLAN IS?

George Dunlap, May 9, 2020. As the good news bubbles to the top of several daily conversations, regarding possible and limited re-opening with COVID19, that I have had, with many of my customers in the United States, the topic we all discuss is, so…what is the plan to re-open our businesses? What are the suggested guidelines and how can we all be part of the solution, “To Re-Open Intelligently and with Cautious Optimism” ? That is the same question I pray to God, how can we as faithful Catholics be part of the Overall Re-Open Our Churches Solution? WE CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT THE LORD’S DAY…….. JOHN SAFRANEK, M.D. wrote a very good article at First Things several days back.

WE CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT THE LORD’S DAY

, by John Safranek, M.D., May 7, 2020

My hospital, like all hospitals throughout the country, has adopted new procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the Emergency Room, where I work, patients cannot even enter the building until someone has determined whether they are harboring the coronavirus. There are elaborate gowning, masking, and gloving routines, as well as a host of other procedural changes. 

Nearly every other department has taken similar measures. When taking X-rays, radiology technicians stand outside the patient’s room, shooting rays through the windows to avoid contaminating the machine. Respiratory therapists no longer use the standard nebulizer machines for fear of propagating the virus. Each department, even the cafeteria, has creatively altered its practices. We have to continue working during this plague, because what we do is essential for individual and social well-being.

I have been thinking about the bishops’ cancellation of public Masses in light of these hospital changes. When many states declared the celebration of the Eucharist non-essential, few bishops resisted. My state banned public gatherings of more than 8-10 people except for “essential” services, which included courts of law (apparently Shakespeare was right: justice delayed is justice denied), business operations, airport travel, and even daycares. My spiritual life is the most important aspect of my being, and the Eucharist is the “source and summit” of my faith—yet it was deemed less essential than daycare, and few bishops demurred.

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Fear vs. Blindness to Life, COVID19 vs Induced Aborption

GEORGE DUNLAP, May 3, 2020. This morning as I got out of bed, I grabbed my robe, and headed to the kitchen, I repeated my routine as I have for the past month and a half, I turned on my water for hot tea, I dished out a small cup of yogurt, while toasting my bread, I feed our 3 cats their morning treats, I then added a spoonful of crunchy peanut butter onto my burnt toast, and returned to my home office to review the COVID19 updates on my computer.

All the while trying to deal with, in my case, Ohio COVID19 deaths as compared to other deaths , as compared to how we as a nation, a state, and even my local county deal with such terrible deaths. For example, Abortions (Induced Abortions), I was curious how the numbers and local response compared.

In 2018, as reported by the Ohio Department of Health, Ohio had about 20,000 induced abortions, my local county had 45 induced abortions. Yet my county did not shut down nor did the State of Ohio. We did not shut down Churches over the deaths of unborn children, we did not close all schools because 20,000 life’s were aborted or some would say killed. It must be easier to deal with the known unborn as apposed to the unseen virus.

It’s not just the deaths and our response to the unborn fetus that should concern us all. Those who die because of, alcohol, drug overdose, suicides, and other untimely deaths should concern us all. Are we as a Catholic Faith dealing with death with Gods blessings? Do we embrace our response or do we hunker down in fear? I am not so sure we fully understand our responsibility to all life.

Fear vs. Induced-Abortions, I am not convinced our response to either is the Godly choice.

Men In Search of God Continue to Gather and Seek His Truth

George Dunlap, April 25, 2020. Yesterday 11 men of Fremont, Ohio gathered together to share and find truth in the Words of God. During this time of COVID-19, with all it’s confusion, we gathered, not to solve the pandemic problem, but, to share and grow in our Catholic-Christian faith. We would much rather be together as brothers; we will not be keep from sharing as one.

Again, [amen,] I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything for which they are to pray, it shall be granted to them by my heavenly Father. 20* m For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.” MATTHEW, CHAPTER 18:19-20. As we gather our Lord Jesus Christ is with us all.

Please join us Saturday May 5th, 2020 @ 8:00 AM, for another Gathering of the Faith, VIA ZOOM. Watch for details.

APRIL 25, 2020, MATTHEW, CHAPTER 18:19-20. For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.”

What Martin Luther Teaches Us About Coronavirus

George Dunlap, April 18, 2020. Today I woke up by the soft purring of 1 of our 3 cats, Jasmine, so named…of my daughters Disney fascination. I grabbed my morning tea and fruit, and jumped on the computer; to read today’s Coronavirus updates. While all along wondering when our Catholic Churches will reopen? I miss those gatherings of coughing and sneezing parishioners. Maybe now we will take seriously an on going concern…of allowing or welcoming… known sick Catholics in our Churches for the sake of filling the pews. We must all respect the health of all by staying at home if sick. But as Martin Luther comments below…our responsibility, as healthy Christians, is not to “hide” at home either.

Is it faithful to flee an epidemic? German reformer’s reflection on the plague can guide Christians in China and everywhere the virus has spread. Emmy Yang January 30, 2020

Image: Betsy Joles / Stringer / Getty Images

From its epicenter in Wuhan, China, the current coronavirus outbreak is stoking fear and disrupting travel and business across the globe. More than 150 people have died from the virus in China alone, and more than 8,000 are infected across 20 countries—exceeding the SARS epidemic in 2003. [Update: As of March 15, more than 3,200 people have died in China, and more than 168,000 have been infected across 120 countries.]

Citizens in Wuhan, a major central city comparable to Chicago, are under lockdown by the government and public activities have come to a standstill, including annual celebrations for Chinese New Year (which began on January 25). Chinese Christians, in Wuhan and China at large, have faced difficult decisions about whether to join the millions of Chinese who return home to visit family (as is customary during the lunar holiday season), to flee from the mainland, or even to gather for regular Sunday services.

But are followers of Jesus right to flee an epidemic when people are suffering and dying?

In the 16th century, German Christians asked theologian Martin Luther for a response to this very question.

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NONE WAS EQUAL TO THE WEIGHT BUT GOD

George Dunlap, April 10,2020. Today, Good Friday, is the Crucifixion of our Lord Jesus Christ, today we learn that our journey by way of the cross is full of, sorrow, pain, grief, death, and hope with beauty. But we know that on Easter we, with redemption, all can choose life with God.

By St. John Henry Newman Friday, April 10, 2020

He had, my dear brethren, to bear the weight of sin; He had to bear your sins; He had to bear the sins of the whole world. Sin is an easy thing to us; we think little of it; we do not understand how the Creator can think much of it; we cannot bring our imagination to believe that it deserves retribution, and, when even in this world punishments follow upon it, we explain them away or turn our minds from them.

But consider what sin is in itself; it is rebellion against God; it is a traitor’s act who aims at the overthrow and death of His sovereign; it is that, if I may use a strong expression, which, could the Divine Governor of the world cease to be, would be sufficient to bring it about.

*Image: The Crucifixion by Francisco de Zurbarán, 1627 [Art Institute of Chicago]. The canvas was painted for the monastery of San Pablo el Real in Seville, Spain. Zurbarán portrays the Lord “suspended outside of time and place.”

Sin is the mortal enemy of the All-holy, so that He and it cannot be together; and as the All-holy drives it from His presence into the outer darkness, so, if God could be less than God, it is sin that would have power to make Him less. And here observe, my brethren, that when once Almighty Love, by taking flesh, entered this created system, and submitted Himself to its laws, then forthwith this antagonist of good and truth, taking advantage of the opportunity, flew at that flesh which He had taken, and fixed on it, and was its death.

The envy of the Pharisees, the treachery of Judas, and the madness of the people, were but the instrument or the expression of the enmity which sin felt towards Eternal Purity as soon as, in infinite mercy towards men, He put Himself within its reach. Sin could not touch His Divine Majesty; but it could assail Him in that way in which He allowed Himself to be assailed, that is, through the medium of His humanity. And in the issue, in the death of God incarnate, you are but taught, my brethren, what sin is in itself, and what it was which then was falling, in its hour and in its strength, upon His human nature, when He allowed that nature to be so filled with horror and dismay at the very anticipation.

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Abortions, 3000 per day and yet we do not shut-down our Churches, our Jobs, or our Lives. Fear is now in control, or some would say…Satan is in control. Easter is full of pain and offers us all salvation.

By George Dunlap, April 7, 2020. Waking up to a world of confusion and unknown, I am challenged to understand the math, to-date we (no death is to be minimized) have lost over 10,000 Americans to the Coronavirus and to-date 294,00, unborn Americans, are killed by the hands of fellow Americans. Fear is now in control of our lives; our feelings, and our faith. We have shut the doors to our Churches because of the FEAR of catching the Virus, but we turn our heads by the screams and crying of 3,000 babies being killed every day. I suggest we have lost our faith and hope. The only weapon is truth, payer, and accepting our sins. What do I suggest? First a return to our trust in God, return to Praying the Rosary daily, and a stronger faithful effort to being fully Catholic. We as Catholics must, be the example, not to be seen as a herd of Fear driven sheep.

Please pray for our souls for we have Lost our Way this Easter Season. The Cross is our path to salvation. It is full of pain and sorrow and it is the branding that transforms us to be with God.

PALM SUNDAY WITHOUT PALMS

George “Thomas” Dunlap, 4/5/2020. Last week I turned 65, since I was a child, my family would return from Church on Palm Sunday, I would always have a palm in my hand, always, and now nothing. I believe in Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior. I now understand, having full and complete acceptance in our Lord without having to feel his wounds. I am learning how to accept without doubt, learning daily now, full belief in our God. AMEN. David G Bonaguar, JR, explains it best see below.

By David G Bonagura, Jr. Sunday, April 5, 2020

Today, in countless Catholic churches the world over, palms will not be given to the faithful. Many of us will watch piously on our TV screens as priests begin by blessing the palm branches in an action that makes this Mass so distinct, so memorable, and, normally, so tactile.

But not this year. We will not be present to receive our palms, to hold them as the Gospel of Jesus’ triumphal ascent into Jerusalem is read, to make crosses out of them, to thread them through our crucifixes upon returning home. It is a Palm Sunday without palms.

The annual commemoration of our Lord’s passion is not meant to be melancholic. Catholics rightly celebrate the events of Holy Week, knowing that the sorrowful passion is the means of our more glorious redemption. And so we begin Mass on this day with a note of triumph: “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, the king of Israel. Hosanna in the highest!”

This year, however, our joy is tempered, with the Coronavirus keeping us from reliving these mysteries, as we ought. Ours is an historical religion, and it is through the Holy Week liturgies, above all, that we are mystically transported to the very moments that changed the world – and each of our lives – forever. Now we have to relive our history with our senses and souls deprived of the accessories: smells, sights, and even physical presence at the liturgical celebrations themselves.

Instead, we will find our historical anchor in something that transcends the senses: the deprivation the disciples felt between the passion and the resurrection.

Normally, receiving palm branches is the first act of our paschal celebration, and it points ahead to the end of the story a week hence. Christ enters Jerusalem today hailed by all as the king of the Jews. The palms, explains the liturgist Fr. Pius Parsch, are “symbols of our loyalty to Him and of our willingness to do Him homage.”

Entry of Christ into Jerusalem by Pietro Di Giovanni D’Ambrogio, c. 1440 [Pinacoteca Stuard, Parma, Italy]

* This procession was one of the few times in His life that our Lord accepted public honors. He only did so on His own terms, upsetting all our expectations of what we think a king should be. He received gold, the symbol of kingly power, only as a helpless infant. Now, as a man who has manifested unimaginable power, He chooses the meekness prophesized by Zechariah, repeated in today’s Mass: “Tell the daughter of Zion: Behold, your king is coming to you, humble, and mounted on an ass, and on a colt, the foal of an ass.” (Matthew 21:5)

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Message on the Combat against the Coronavirus COVID-19

George Dunlap, April 4, 2020, As important and essential as going to the grocery, gas station, drug store, our ability to go into our churches for personal and faith healing food.. is an essential need. Closing completely the doors of Gods House will not provide internal peace. Cardinal Burke explains it best in the below essay. This is way we as Catholic Men need to meet and Pray together. We must not Hunker Down and Wait. God Bless us all.

Cardinal Raymond Burke, March 21, 2020

Dear Friends,

For some time now, we have been in combat against the spread of the coronavirus, COVID-19. From all that we can tell – and one of the difficulties of the combat is that so much about the pestilence remains unclear – , the battle will yet continue for some time. The virus involved is particularly insidious, for it has a relatively long incubation period – some say 14 days and some say 20 days – and is highly contagious, much more highly contagious than other viruses we have experienced.

One of the principal natural means to defend ourselves against the coronavirus is to avoid any close contact with others. It is important, in fact, to keep always a distance – some say a yard (meter) and some say six-feet – away from each other, and, of course, to avoid group gatherings, that is gatherings in which a number of people are in close proximity of each other. In addition, since the virus is transmitted by small droplets emitted when one sneezes or blows his or her nose, it is critical to wash our hands frequently with disinfectant soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds, and to use disinfectant handwash and handwipes. It is equally important to disinfect tables, chairs, countertops, etc., on which these droplets may have landed and from which they are capable of transmitting the contagion for some time. If we sneeze or blow our nose, we are counseled to use a paper facial tissue, to discard it immediately, and then to wash our hands. Of course, those who are diagnosed with the coronavirus must be quarantined, and those who are not feeling well, even if it has not been determined that they suffer from the coronavirus, should, out of charity toward others, remain at home, until they are feeling better.

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