Monthly Archives: March 2020

A QUARANTINE SYLLABUS FOR TEENAGE BOYS

George Dunlap, March 31, 2020. So what are you doing with your time, during the pandemic, with your children? Video games, all day Netflix shows; how about reading or better yet…see below. This is a classic approach to what is needed in our Catholic homes during this most interesting crisis. This pandemic will pass but will we has adults use it to develop better citizens and more… faithful Catholics?

by Mark Bauerlein, March 31, 2020 from First Things

Okay, First Things parents. Those of you with adolescent boys at home—you need help. So do I.

No matter how energetic and vigilant the teachers are in this time of seclusion, hours at home can’t replicate the classroom. As soon as the online assignment is finished, once the streaming lecture is over, the boys drift back to the iPhone for games and peer banter and pictures. The atmosphere of the school disappears. Instead, boys are back in their private spaces (and virtual social spaces), wherein books and knowledge are negligible matters.

You have been thrust into the role of part-time homeschooler with little warning, and you need better tactics than the bare confiscation of that demonic device. By all means, take the tool away, but give it back after the boys have done their daily work for school and spent some time with the syllabus you have fashioned as a supplement to it.

In the area of history, have them watch episodes of Appointment with Destiny, a short-lived series from 50 years ago that 14-year-old boys will love. There are only a half-dozen entries in the series, each one a documentary-style recreation of a fateful moment in time. One episode dramatizes Cortes and Montezuma, another one the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. There are reconstructions of Appomattox, the hunt for John Dillinger, the attempted assassination of Hitler. Lorne Greene narrates some, Rod Serling others. Historical figures speak to the camera as if they are on 60 Minutes. Historical settings, clothing, speech, and actions are reproduced with vivid fidelity. Check out one episode here.

In the area of music, let’s introduce them to the classical tradition with an engaging battery of lectures by Leonard Bernstein. The site is Harvard University, the time 1973. Bernstein was in residence at Harvard for a year, savoring the academic climate and ending up idolized by the students. He had to give six public lectures, which he devoted to music theory from Mozart to Stravinsky, using Noam Chomsky’s linguistics as a conceptual frame. He sits at the piano explaining what happened with Beethoven et al., then turns to the piano to illustrate the point. Occasionally, the lecture breaks away to a film of Bernstein conducting the Boston Orchestra in the symphonic pieces he is discussing—such as Berlioz’s Romeo and Juliet. Some of the theory will go over the heads of younger teens, but Bernstein’s winning manner and the brilliance of the examples he plays on the piano make everything clear. Here is the lecture on the Romantics.

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The Virus – and Other Moral Hazards

George Dunlap, March 24, 2020. Back to my earlier post on March 19, 2020, Finding Balance. Do we as Catholics really ever choose to engage or are we just arm chair prayer soldiers, we are standing by as our nation kills the unborn. We are also moving to killing Grand Ma & Grand Pa by mindless acceptance of euthanasia, no one whats to care for the Old Folks….and someday they may not want to care for you or me.

Time for Tea and Crumpets is over. We must engage evil; with Gods son Jesus Christ as our one true Shepherd.

The below essay by Hadley Arkes compares our desire to save lives, only the ones present, not the unseen gifts, from God, the children. I pray ,one day, soon we all understand that by our in-action we are no different than those doing the killing.

Hadley Arkes Tuesday, March 24, 2020

I count myself as one of those votaries, working in the vineyard of natural law, who does not find his work among “theories.”  I am drawn, with others of my club, to those precepts of “common sense” that ordinary people routinely do grasp in order to get on with the business of life – the things they need to know before they are capable of trafficking in theories.  Before anyone engages in banter with David Hume about the meaning of “causation,” he knows – even without realizing that he knows – his own active powers to cause his own acts to happen.

British philosopher John Finnis would point up in this vein the many ways in which people weave into their acts every day an anchoring premise about the goodness of preserving human life.  In Finnis’s examples, we look both ways from the curb before we cross the street; we hold drives to rescue people from famine in distant countries. We have not yet exactly constituted a hospital or emergency service built on the premise that the main mission in dealing with an injured person is to dispatch him to his death more quickly in order to relieve his family of hard decisions. With an assumption they never think to question, these services take their mission as the saving of lives.

*Image: Danse Macabre by Michael Wolgemut, 1493 [Duchess Anna Amalia Library, Weimar, Germany]
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Amish Ethics – a way of life for all Christians to consider…

George Dunlap, March 22, 2020. As a father, a husband, a christian, and a neighbor here in Fremont, I find my need to return to God’s plan… growing daily. Below is from The Daily Record, October 1, 2012 based in Wooster, OH. Located near one of the Amish centers in Ohio.

Visitors to the Amish Heartland may think of the Amish as “those people who dress funny and ride in buggies.” Some people think Amish and Mennonite families live in closed communities or colonies, and rarely see the outside world. A few tourists have even mistaken Amish for costumed actors, portraying the “old days” for the amusement and education of visitors, who then go home to their televisions and computer games. There are many myths and misconceptions about the way the Amish have chosen to live.

What are the principles that form the foundation of Amish life and belief? Why have the Amish been so successful in preserving those principles for more than three centuries?

COMMITMENT

The Amish have a strong sense of commitment to God, family, church and community. Their faith is rooted in a literal interpretation of the Bible and in the Ordnung, the rules of conduct handed down for generations, regularly reviewed and earnestly taken to heart. Their dedication to family guides decisions about where to live and what occupation to pursue. Divorce is extremely rare, and much, if not most, of an Amish person’s life revolves around their large extended families. Beyond the family circle are the congregation and greater community. Although the Amish do not live in communes or closed communities, they do tend to live closely grouped together, for the sake of fellowship, support and more practical reasons. The businesses that provide resources for the Amish way of life, such as buggy-makers, blacksmiths and stores selling non-electric appliances, for example, need a pool of customers to draw from in order to stay in business. In a community heavily populated by Amish, such as in Holmes County, business owners can make a living, and the Amish have resources they can rely on for the products and services they need to maintain their way of life.

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Finding Balance

George Dunlap, March 19, 2020, This morning when I got up I expected the same #Death, #Doom and #COVID-19 news updates. Yesterday I was asked to cancel our Saturday morning gatherings. Even our Easter Lenten services have been shut-down. I am having a hard time with that…….. But I found this article from a gentlemen I follow daily and I am inspired once more, that, others also say, “Balance” is needed. We must look to God not our Government for strength, and we must take personal responsibility of our Cleanliness. Please read on and May God Be with you.

Wed, Mar 18, 2020, BY JOHN SCHROEDER

I need to point everybody to what I consider one of the most important tweet threads I have read through this whole coronavirus thing – From Brian Wesbury.  Highlights of the 7 tweet string:

…even a 30-day lockdown won’t make the virus go away. In fact, going to the grocery store potentially exposes you. So any solution other than complete martial law shows a willingness of leaders to risk some lives.

The US should: A)Test as many as we can. B)Build up hospital capacity. C)Protect the vulnerable. D)Announce that we will extend the shutdowns for only 10 more days. E)Let businesses start opening, with common sense safety practices F)Quarantine or hospitalize the sick.

Yes, this virus kills, but they all do. And, according to much research, recessions and unemployment kill too. The government will permanently expand and risks to growth and health will increase.

I have been thinking along these lines all along.  Yesterday I tried to point out that shutting down the world represents an enormous shift in our view of the value of human life.  Let me be more blunt.

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FEMINISM’S UNEXPECTED CURE, WITH A LITTLE SUPPORT… FROM THEIR HUSBANDS

BY: George Dunlap, March 11, 2020, We as Catholic Men must sign-on to support, Carrie Gress’s article, with our wives and daughters in this re-birth of our Christian obligation to family and faith. Let us all join in on the rebirth of our family in Christ.

Feminism’s Unexpected Cure

By Carrie Gress Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Five decades ago, radical feminist Kate Millett and her eleven friends in New York City recited a type of litany, a feminist manifesto of sorts, that has proven to be remarkably effective:

“Why are we here today?” the chairwoman asked.

“To make revolution,” they answered.

“What kind of revolution?”

“The Cultural Revolution.”

“And how do we make Cultural Revolution?”

“By destroying the American family!”

“How do we destroy the family?”

“By destroying the American Patriarch.”

“And how do we destroy the American Patriarch?”

“By taking away his power!”

“How do we do that?”

“By destroying monogamy!”

“How can we destroy monogamy?”

“By promoting promiscuity, eroticism, prostitution, abortion, and homosexuality!”

I’ve always been struck by the last line. Did those 12 women ever dream that their tiny effort would be so wildly successful? We witness their success daily, from half-time shows to celebrities insisting their careers and awards are more important than their children, from royal tantrums even to the tragic gender confusion foisted upon children.

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Coronavirus and the Catholic Church

George Dunlap, March 1, 2020. Not wanting to be contributing to the “Panic and The End of the World” crowd, this article does bring a number of issues to light. We as Catholic’s need to pray for calm and understand what we may need to face.

The Catholic Church will be impacted by the looming pandemic.

Coronavirus continues to spread rapidly around the globe. Still hoping to contain the disease, the World Health Organization refuses to declare a pandemic, but warns time is short. As the disease appears likely to break out of containment, it may spread around the world and could also impact the Church. A major outbreak is spreading in Italy. 

The Church will be impacted by the spread of the virus. Here's what you need to know.

The Church will be impacted by the spread of the virus. Here’s what you need to know.

Highlights

By Marshall Connolly (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
2/24/2020 (5 days ago)

Published in Living Faith


LOS ANGELES, CA (California Network) The arthritic is as grim as it is simple. The COVID-19 Coronavirus can spread from person to person easily, and before symptoms can be detected. This makes efforts to contain the disease almost futile. It is now just a matter of time before the disease becomes a global pandemic. Still, officials are reticent to declare the disease a pandemic and are hoping to contain the virus. But each day, the numbers of cases grow and new outbreaks are reported. 

It is time to prepare, and to consider how this disease will impact our lives. As Catholics, the spreading disease will impact our Church and our parish communities. 

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