Most Americans Think Cohabitation Is Fine, But That’s Not What Social Science Says

BY: George Dunlap, December 3, 2019 As a Dad preparing to walk down the isle…….I pray our children will come to understand our Catholic way and learn from the mistakes made. God Bless us all. For the promise, we make to God, that beautiful day, will come due. This article is very timely in my life, I pray we learn from our mistakes. Redemption is the Hope of Salvation.

By Peter Sprigg December 2, 2019

the wedding day…… ( Photo Image by Michael Mangin from Pixabay )

A nineteenth-century humorist once warned that a bigger problem than knowing little is “to know so many things that ain’t so.” Well, Americans know “many things that ain’t so” about cohabitation and marriage.

A new Pew Research Center study shows Americans both cohabitate (“live with an unmarried partner”) and find cohabitation acceptable more than before. But other research shows this is unwise. Here is what the Pew Research Center found.

More young adults have cohabited than have married. Pew’s analysis in the summer of 2019 of the National Survey of Family Growth found that, for the first time ever, the percentage of American adults aged 18-44 who have ever cohabited with a partner (59 percent) exceeded the percentage of those who have ever married (50 percent).

It should be noted, however, that the current living arrangements of adults of all ages still show a strong preference for marriage: 53 percent of American adults are currently married, while only 7 percent of adults are currently cohabiting (although cohabitation has risen from only 3 percent in 1995). These findings may either reflect that many people cohabit first and then marry, or that cohabiting relationships are less stable and thus much shorter than marriages.

A majority of Americans (69 percent) say that “it is acceptable for an unmarried couple to live together even if they don’t plan to get married.” They may assume that they can decrease their chances of a bad marriage and increase their chances of a good one by giving the relationship a cohabitation “test run.”

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Dismas and His Opposites

BY: George Dunlap, November 24, 2019,

I find Fr. Scalia’s writings to be very current and to the point. My failure is, that I do not live my faith in public, but in private…in hiding. I must show the world my faith with humility and passion. I pray I do not live my life like “the rulers”…waiting for a leader, riding in on a warhorse…imposing his Kingdom over the sinners.

By Fr. Paul D. Scalia Sunday, November 24, 2019

*Image: The Soul of the Good Thief (L’âme du bon Larron) by James J. Tissot, c.1890 [Brooklyn Museum]

Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom. These words of Saint Dismas, the Good Thief, saved in his last hours on a cross, resound as a perfect acknowledgment of Christ as King. Their power becomes more evident when contrasted with the words of others at that moment. At Calvary, there are three other reactions to the Crucified One. They come from Dismas’s opposites and reveal the attitudes that always oppose Christ the King.

First, the rulers. [They] sneered at Jesus and said, “He saved others, let him save himself if he is the chosen one, the Christ of God.” These are not pagans or unbelievers but Israel’s own religious leaders. These are the men who awaited their King, anticipated His coming, and desired His rule. But, as comes to be clear, they did so on their own terms. Jesus of Nazareth did not meet their requirements for kingship. He comes not on a warhorse to impose a kingdom, but humble, and mounted on an ass. (Mt 21:5) He comes not to judge but to seek and to save what was lost (Lk 19:10), to call not the righteous but sinners. (cf. Lk 5:32)

Second, the Roman soldiers. [They] jeered at him. As they approached to offer him wine they called out, “If you are King of the Jews, save yourself.” The great genius of the Romans was that they tolerated the religion of their subjects. Of course, that tolerance was cynical and lasted only as long as the people kept the gods in the proper place and their religion to themselves. Faith was tolerable only when kept private or confined to certain areas and spheres of life. It became intolerable when it made public claims. For Him to be executed, Jesus had to be presented as a political threat to Roman rule. Religion must be kept in its place.

Third, the bad thief: [O]ne of the criminals hanging there reviled Jesus, saying, “Are you not the Christ? Save yourself and us.” You would think that he would remain silent, if only to hedge his bets against impending judgment. But he is unrepentant. In the midst of his suffering, he lashes out at God rather than acknowledge his sins and ask forgiveness. Even in his agony, he prefers his own will to that of Christ the King.

These reactions do not remain solely in the past. We see them throughout history – in every rejection of revelation, persecution of the faithful, and refusal to repent. More to the point, they continue in us. Each rejection of Christ the King can be found, at one time or another, within us. * We at times resemble Israel’s religious leaders: we want God, but on our own terms. We long for His coming and cry out for His help. . . but then resent His intrusion and the challenges He presents. We want a king, to be sure. In fact, we know exactly how he should behave.

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Intimations of Immortality in the Americas

By Robert Royal Monday, November 18, 2019

Intimations of eternity are rare in this life. I had one, about this time of the year, when I was in high school. I’m enough of a modern man to know how unreal the claim seems. But it’s true. I was walking with a few friends under autumn leaves. We’d just been reading Virgil together in Latin, during last period. From somewhere, there welled up in me an overwhelming sense of both geologic ages and the immense extent of human life. And something beyond even those. Years later, I came upon an Italian poem – L’infinito – that captures the experience. I had a similar experience this past Saturday morning. Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of San Francisco celebrated an Extraordinary Form Latin “Mass of the Americas” at the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, accompanied by the music of Frank La Rocca, whom the archbishop had commissioned for that purpose. You can watch it by clicking here. But listening to the recording and even watching the video can’t even begin to convey what the Mass was like in the Basilica. To underscore just one element, Archbishop Cordileone celebrated the Mass on the main altar under the baldacchino, way at the back of the church (instead of the new altar closer to the congregation). That had a marvelous effect. At least for me.

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Shepherds to a Wounded Flock: How Our Priests See the Crisis – will be live streamed…..

https://thecatholicproject.org/

Shepherds to a Wounded Flock: How Our Priests See the Crisis

Cost: FREE

Over the past year, much of the discussion about the abuse crisis has focused on justice for victims, accountability for bishops, and the role of lay people. There are obvious reasons for this. Yet genuine renewal in the Church must include our priests, who have experienced the pain of the crisis in a particular way. For this reason, The Catholic Project is pleased to host a conversation with four local priests about the fallout of the abuse crisis—how it affects our priests, how it affects their ministry, and what it means for the future of the Church in the United States.

OUR PANELISTS

Fr. Paul Scalia is Vicar for Clergy in the Diocese of Arlington and Pastor of Saint James Parish in Falls Church, Virginia. He is the author of That Nothing May Be Lost and editor of Sermons in Times of Crisis.

Fr. Carter Griffin is a priest of the Archdiocese of Washington and rector of St. John Paul II Seminary. He served as a naval officer before entering the seminary and was ordained in 2004. He is the author of Why Celibacy: Reclaiming the Fatherhood of the Priest, published earlier this year.

Fr. Matthew Fish is the Administrator of Holy Family Church and School in Hillcrest Heights, Maryland. Originally from Washington State, he did his undergraduate studies at Franciscan University of Steubenville in Ohio. He holds graduate degrees in philosophy and in theology from The Catholic University of America and the Pontifical University of St Thomas Aquinas in Rome.

Fr. Robert Boxie III was born and raised in southwest Louisiana, is a priest of the Archdiocese of Washington, and was ordained in 2016. He completed his seminary studies at Theological College at CUA and at the North American College in Rome. He is currently the parochial vicar at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Largo, Maryland.


To livestream the event, click HERE.