Shepherds to a Wounded Flock: How Our Priests See the Crisis – will be live streamed…..

https://thecatholicproject.org/

Shepherds to a Wounded Flock: How Our Priests See the Crisis

Cost: FREE

Over the past year, much of the discussion about the abuse crisis has focused on justice for victims, accountability for bishops, and the role of lay people. There are obvious reasons for this. Yet genuine renewal in the Church must include our priests, who have experienced the pain of the crisis in a particular way. For this reason, The Catholic Project is pleased to host a conversation with four local priests about the fallout of the abuse crisis—how it affects our priests, how it affects their ministry, and what it means for the future of the Church in the United States.

OUR PANELISTS

Fr. Paul Scalia is Vicar for Clergy in the Diocese of Arlington and Pastor of Saint James Parish in Falls Church, Virginia. He is the author of That Nothing May Be Lost and editor of Sermons in Times of Crisis.

Fr. Carter Griffin is a priest of the Archdiocese of Washington and rector of St. John Paul II Seminary. He served as a naval officer before entering the seminary and was ordained in 2004. He is the author of Why Celibacy: Reclaiming the Fatherhood of the Priest, published earlier this year.

Fr. Matthew Fish is the Administrator of Holy Family Church and School in Hillcrest Heights, Maryland. Originally from Washington State, he did his undergraduate studies at Franciscan University of Steubenville in Ohio. He holds graduate degrees in philosophy and in theology from The Catholic University of America and the Pontifical University of St Thomas Aquinas in Rome.

Fr. Robert Boxie III was born and raised in southwest Louisiana, is a priest of the Archdiocese of Washington, and was ordained in 2016. He completed his seminary studies at Theological College at CUA and at the North American College in Rome. He is currently the parochial vicar at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Largo, Maryland.


To livestream the event, click HERE.

Michael & Kelsea Hess and family. Today’s Millennial’s talk about TMIY, their faith, and their family.

Michael & Kelsea Hess and children

Michael Hess has been part of the Fremont Catholic Men’s Group since our first TMIY, September 2015. Michael became one of the CORE team leaders for year 2, and has been a very faithful part of our Fremont program ever since. Michael’s wife, Kelsea, is very active in the St. Vincent de Paul Society here in Fremont. She is a proud mom of 3 beautiful children. She is very involved in many programs @ St. Joseph’s.

I recently sat down with Kelsea and Michael, and we talked about their faith, their family, and how they feel the Fremont Catholic Men’s Group and TMIY has helped them in their daily family and catholic community’s lives.

Michael and Kelsea represent a group of Catholic Millennial’s that do represent the best in our Catholic future. George Dunlap, 9/13/2019

TMIY Year 5 starts September 21.

From “Home-Alone America” to “Primal Screams”: in 15 Years or Less

George Dunlap, August 29, 2019: I have followed Mary Eberstadt’s writings for several years. First starting with her book Adam and Eve after the Pill. She is a Catholic writer with great depth and passion. Her understanding of human nature and God have helped me understand our “Fallen Nature” and our need for Redemption. I trust if you take the time and patience you too will find Mary’s work a blessing.

Mary Eberstadt Wednesday, August 28, 2019

This week, Templeton Press is releasing my new book, Primal Screams: How the Sexual Revolution Created Identity Politics. Because the Faith and Reason Institute is my happy professional home, I’d like to set aside standard book promo, and instead share with TCT’s readers some of the backstory for this new volume.

Seen one way, the work leading up to this book began with a wisecrack. In the 1980s, right after graduating from college with majors in philosophy and government, I was hired as an assistant editor at The Public Interest magazine in New York. Its fabled editor was Irving Kristol, a formidable intellectual and wit with a first-rate, small-“c,” catholic mind. (He was also something of an imp – as his self-description of “neo-orthodox, non-observant Jew” might suggest.)

One day, as we were all sitting in the tiny smoke-filled office on East 53rd Street, Irving looked up from his newspaper and remarked, “One of the funniest things about the twentieth century is that if you were to read all of its documents and ask which one was the most prophetic about the world to come, it would be Humanae Vitae.”

The thought was unexpected and contrarian, as Irving’s bon mots usually were. The staff, myself included, duly laughed. But that heretical notion stuck. This was the first time I remember thinking that there might be something to the argument that the sexual revolution was upending the world – and that it wasn’t only the Catholic Church that could see it.

That small epiphany would go on to play a part in some of my work. My first book, Home-Alone America (2004), looked at the record of rising post-revolutionary damage in places that sociologists and others had been measuring for years – mainly, the ravaged home and its attendant problems, especially among children.

Adam and Eve after the Pill (2012) widened the lens to examine the revolution’s apparent effects on men, women, and the change in mores. Both books invoked evidence from across the cultural spectrum, including literature, popular culture, sociology, and first-hand reports from therapists and others on the front lines. These books also documented disturbing trends that would not become common knowledge until recently, such as rising rates of psychiatric trouble among the young.

The growing empirical record was greatly at odds with the dominant cultural insistence on the purported benefits of post-1960s liberation. How the West Really Lost God (2013) took the next logical step of examining the relationship between the new sexual order and the churches. Secularization, it concluded, has been widely misunderstood. It is not inevitable. History shows instead that religiosity waxes and wanes over time. It is as robust – or as weak – as the force through which it is largely transmitted: the family.

My new book, Primal Screams, is a capstone of sorts to these previous efforts. It examines the legacy of post-1960s change at one more macrocosmic level: politics. Primal Screams argues in part that the signature political movement of our time – identity politics – is rooted in the post-revolutionary erasure of self, brought on by the shrinkage and implosion of the family.

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It Matters What You Think

By: George Dunlap, August 26, 2019, The only power we as Christians have over evil is the Power of Truth from God, and that truth comes from rigorous study. Ignorance is not bless. The Aquinas 101 program is another great resource for our continuing search for truth and God’s Blessings.

It Matters What You Think By Robert Royal Monday, August 26, 2019

I wrote here recently about the Thomistic Institutes, an initiative of the Dominican House of Studies in Washington D.C., which organizes lectures and conferences by first-rate, orthodox Catholics at nearly fifty (and growing) of the most prestigious colleges and universities in America. And expansion to parts foreign is on the way. Many readers wrote to express their appreciation of this much-needed network – but also to ask: What to do if nothing of that sort is available nearby? There’s now an answer. Today, August 26, Aquinas 101 – a website created by the same Dominicans – goes live (click here, and prepare yourself for a bracing experience). The series will eventually consist of eighty-six brief lessons, carefully geared for study by anyone of normal capabilities and interest. Did I mention that the course is open to everyone – and free? This is an accessible, well-crafted introduction to the greatest of all Dominican thinkers, St. Thomas Aquinas, which will not only put you in touch with the man who has most shaped Catholic thought for centuries, but will help you see how that body of thought has great relevance to some of the most neuralgic questions we face. For example, a lot of people today, even Christians, even Catholics, have fallen into some basic confusions about the nature of Faith and Reason. As an early lecture in the series explains, this leads – on the one hand – to skepticism (we can’t really know anything about God), but also – on the other hand – to what has been termed “fideism,” that we just believe without knowing what we believe in. Both are natural reactions in a post-truth age, but a searching Catholic will not want to let his or her thinking remain stuck in our current social funk. There are better and “truer” ideas about truth, so to speak, that Aquinas and others provide us. You’ve probably seen the recent survey that shows how few people, even among practicing Catholics, believe in Christ’s Real Presence in the Eucharist. Many regard it as a mere “symbol.” Ultimately, the Eucharist is a deep mystery, but holy and gifted men like Aquinas have used the various tools of the tradition and of human reason to offer serious, rational approaches to what ultimately transcends us – and all Creation. Thomas Reese, a Jesuit priest, recently commented on the survey that he didn’t believe in the terms like substance, accident, matter, and form that Aquinas uses to explain the Eucharist because modern science has discredited them. In fact, science has not done so and cannot do so because the way the Scholastic thinkers use those terms is philosophical. It does not and cannot conflict with science – ancient, modern, postmodern, or anything to come, ever. But you would have to have studied what those terms mean and how Faith and Reason are related to know why.

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